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COVID-19 Vaccine Bookings to Open For All Children Aged Five to 11

COVID-19 Vaccine Bookings to Open For All Children Aged Five to 11

Families can book appointments through a variety of channels starting November 23rd TORONTO — Following Health Canada’s approval of the paediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, children aged five to 11 will be eligible to book their appointment to receive the vaccine beginning Tuesday, November 23, 2021. Approximately one million children aged five to 11 are eligible to receive the vaccine which will help protect Ontario’s progress in the fight against COVID-19 and keep the province’s schools safer and open for in-person learning as more people move indoors and attend family gatherings during the colder months this winter. “The approval of the Pfizer vaccine for children aged five to 11 is exciting news for families and represents a bright light at the end of the tunnel,” said Christine Elliott, Deputy Premier and Minister of Health. “Offering the protection of the vaccine to children aged five to 11 is a significant milestone in Ontario’s fight against COVID-19 in advance of the holiday season. We continue to encourage all Ontarians to roll up their sleeves and get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families and their communities.” As of 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, November 23, 2021, children aged five to 11 across Ontario will be eligible to schedule a COVID-19 vaccine appointment through a variety of channels including the COVID-19 vaccination portal and contact centre, directly through public health units using their own booking system, participating pharmacies which individuals can find on Ontario’s website using the pharmacy locator, and select primary care providers. To book an appointment online, children must be turning five years old by the end of 2021 (born in 2016). Ontario is expected to receive 1,076,000 doses of the paediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine from the federal government, which will then be immediately distributed to public health units, pharmacies, and primary care settings across the province. Appointments across the province are expected to begin as early as November 25 when the federal supply arrives at vaccine clinics across the province. “Receiving vaccine approval for children aged five to 11 is another critical milestone in our vaccination efforts,” said Solicitor General Sylvia Jones. “Across the province, Ontarians have rolled up their sleeves to get vaccinated to stop the spread of COVID-19 and now parents can take comfort in knowing their children will also have the opportunity to be protected.” “Increasing vaccine rates will help to further minimize disruption and keep students learning in a more normal in-class experience,” said Stephen Lecce, Minister of Education. “As a result of widespread ventilation improvements, increasing investments, and comprehensive testing options, Ontario has one of the lowest case rates for youth under 20 in Canada.” In addition, the province, in conjunction with Health Canada’s First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, has launched Operation Remote Immunity 3.0 (ORI 3.0) to support the administration of COVID-19 vaccines for children aged five to 11 in Northern and Remote First Nation communities, as well as booster doses to eligible populations. ORI 3.0 will run until March 2022. “Keeping a low rate of infection in our communities is vital to keeping our schools, our businesses and our social settings as safe as possible while minimizing disruption,” said Dr. Kieran Moore, Chief Medical Officer of Health. “The paediatric Pfizer vaccine offered to children aged five to 11 will be a lower dose that is safe and effective at protecting this age group from COVID-19 and the Delta variant. I strongly encourage every parent and caregiver to get their younger children vaccinated and protected.” Achieving the highest vaccination rates possible is key to limiting the risk of transmission and protecting our hard-fought progress against COVID-19. Together with its partners the government continues its Last Mile Strategy to administer thousands of first and second doses to adults and youth already eligible for their shot as we also continue to provide booster doses to nearly three million eligible Ontarians. Quick Facts Children aged five to 11 (and turning age five in 2021) will receive the paediatric Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine which is a slightly modified, lower dose (one-third the amount given to individuals aged 12 and over), in a two-dose series at a recommended interval of eight weeks between first and second doses. It’s okay to have questions about the COVID-19 vaccines. Parents, caregivers and children are encouraged to call the Provincial Vaccine Confidence Line that can be accessed by calling the Provincial Vaccine Contact Centre at 1-833-943-3900, or visit COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service to book a confidential phone appointment with a SickKids clinician. Parents or caregivers of children aged five to 11 will usually have to provide consent on behalf of the child before or at the time of the appointment. As of November 19, nearly 85 per cent of youth aged 12 to 17 have received a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and more than 80 per cent have received a second dose. Unvaccinated people are 24 times more likely to be in the hospital and 43 times more likely to be in the ICU. As we head into the colder months and more people gather indoors, the government is enhancing its COVID-19 testing strategy by expanding the number of testing locations and making it more convenient to access publicly funded testing for those who need it. Quotes "The COVID-19 vaccine has been proven to be very effective at preventing severe disease and hospitalization in adults - and now clinical trial data suggest that the same appears to be true for young school-aged children. I and many other Ontario parents are feeling lucky that we have the opportunity to get our children immunized, thereby taking another step to prevent COVID-19 spread within our households and communities."
- Dr. Jeff Pernica, Ontario Immunization Advisory Council (OIAC) & Associate Professor, McMaster Additional Resources Paediatric Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine: Frequently Asked Questions Summary of The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) Statement of November 19, 2021 Ontario.ca/covidvaccinekids Ontario Expanding Booster Eligibility to More Ontarians For public inquiries, please contact the Provincial Vaccine Contact Centre at 1-833-943-3900 (TTY for people who are deaf, hearing-impaired or speech-impaired: 1-866-797-0007). For resources in multiple languages to help local communication efforts in responding to COVID-19, visit Ontario’s COVID-19 communication resources webpage. Visit Ontario’s website to learn more about how the province continues to protect the people of Ontario from COVID-19.

Paediatric Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine: Frequently Asked Questions

Paediatric Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine: Frequently Asked Questions

Why should my child get the COVID-19 vaccine? On Friday, November 19, 2021, Health Canada authorized the use of the paediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for children aged five to 11. Health Canada has one of the most rigorous scientific review systems in the world and only approves a vaccine if it is safe, works, and meets the highest manufacturing and quality standards.
Vaccinating children and youth will provide them with a strong level of protection against COVID-19 and the highly contagious Delta variant, keep schools safe and open, and stop the spread of the virus. This will help protect other family members too, such as those under five years old who can’t get vaccinated yet, or more vulnerable elderly individuals. Will children aged five to 11 receive the same dosage of the COVID-19 vaccine as other age groups? What is the dose interval for this age group? No. Children aged five to 11 will receive the paediatric Pfizer vaccine, which is a distinct formulation at a lower dose of one-third the amount given to individuals aged 12 and over, in a two-dose series at a recommended interval of eight weeks. When and how can parents or caregivers book a COVID-19 vaccination appointment for their children aged five to 11? As of 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, November 23, 2021, children aged five to 11 across Ontario will be eligible to schedule a paediatric COVID-19 vaccine appointment through the COVID-19 vaccination portal or by calling the Provincial Vaccine Contact Centre at 1-833-943-3900. Families can also book directly through public health units that use their own booking systems, Indigenous-led vaccination clinics and participating pharmacies. Some public health units may also be offering walk-in or pop-up vaccination clinics across the province. Please reach out to your public health unit for more information. Appointments across the province will begin as early as November 25, when federal supply is expected to arrive at vaccine clinics across the province. Will children be able to get the vaccine from their primary care provider? Select primary care providers will be administering the paediatric COVID-19 vaccine. Parents and caregivers who are interested in booking their child’s paediatric COVID-19 vaccine appointment with their primary care provider will need to reach out to their primary care provider to confirm whether they are offering the vaccine. Participating primary care providers will use their own appointment booking systems, not the provincial portal. Will I have to book my second dose appointment for my child? Individuals who use the COVID-19 vaccination portal can book their child’s second dose appointment after they have received their first dose, at an interval of eight weeks. Individuals whose child receives their vaccine at a pharmacy should discuss with the pharmacy location about how they are booking second doses. Primary care providers will work with parents and caregivers whose children they vaccinate with a paediatric COVID-19 vaccine to book a second dose appointment. Are there enough doses for every child? Yes. Ontario is expected to receive 1,076,000 doses of the paediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine in the first shipment from the federal government, which will be sufficient supply to provide a first dose to every eligible child. Will children receive proof that they are vaccinated? Yes. Vaccine certificates with QR codes will be available for children aged five to 11 on the COVID-19 vaccination portal as a record of their vaccination.
However, at this time there are no requirements for children aged five to 11 to show proof of vaccination in Ontario. There may be different requirements in other jurisdictions. Will parents or caregivers need to provide consent for their children aged 5 to 11 to get vaccinated? Parents or substitute decision makers of children aged five to 11 will usually have to provide consent on behalf of their child at the time of the appointment or fill out a paper consent form for their child. Consent forms will be provided online and in paper at clinics. What will the vaccination experience be like for my child? A number of locations offering the COVID-19 vaccine for children aged five to 11 will be customized to ensure a child-friendly environment. This includes providing sensory-friendly clinic options such as reduced noise and reduced bright lights, and setting up clinics to offer privacy like cubicles or family pods so you can be with your child when they receive the vaccine. In addition, all public health units will offer select clinics at or near schools to facilitate access and provide another safe environment to administer the vaccine to this age group. Clinics will be offered primarily after school hours (e.g. evenings and weekends) to support convenient and welcoming options for children and families. I have questions about the vaccine for children aged five to 11. Where can I get more information? Visit Ontario.ca/covidvaccinekids to learn more about COVID-19 vaccines for children and youth. Fact Sheet: COVID-19 Vaccines for Children and Youth You can also contact the Provincial Vaccine Contact Centre to speak to an experienced agent or health specialist at 1-833-943-3900 (TTY for people who are deaf, hearing-impaired or speech-impaired: 1-866-797-0007), available in more than 300 languages, seven days a week from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. In addition, you can contact the SickKids COVID-19 Vaccine Consult Service to book a confidential phone appointment with a SickKids paediatric Registered Nurse through www.sickkids.ca/vaccineconsult, or call 1-888-304-6558. Additional Resources COVID-19 Vaccine Bookings to Open For All Children Aged Five to 11

Ontario Pausing the Lifting of Capacity Limits in Remaining Settings

Ontario Pausing the Lifting of Capacity Limits in Remaining Settings

Province’s Cautious Approach Key to Protecting Our Progress TORONTO — The Ontario government, in consultation with the Chief Medical Officer of Health, is pausing the lifting of capacity limits in remaining higher-risk settings as outlined in A Plan to Safely Reopen Ontario and Manage COVID-19 for the Long-Term. This is being done out of an abundance of caution as the province monitors public health trends. The phased and cautious approach to Ontario’s safe reopening includes ongoing monitoring and assessment of key public health and health care indicators. While Ontario’s hospital and intensive care capacity remains stable and the province continues to report one of the lowest rates of active cases in the country, certain public health trends, including the effective reproduction number and percent positivity have increased slightly over the past week. An increase in cases was always expected as more people move indoors due to the colder weather and as the province eased measures. However, out of an abundance of caution, existing capacity limits and physical distancing requirements for higher-risk settings where proof of vaccination is required will remain in place to ensure the province has the required time to better understand any potential impact on hospitalizations and ICU admissions. These higher-risk settings include: food or drink establishments with dance facilities such as night clubs and wedding receptions in meeting/event spaces where there is dancing; strip clubs; and sex clubs and bathhouses. The government and the Chief Medical Officer of Health will continue to monitor the data for the next 28 days to determine when it is safe to lift capacity limits in these settings.
“Throughout the pandemic our government has taken a cautious approach to reopening, ensuring our hospital capacity remains stable and the province continues to report one of the lowest rates of active cases in the country,” said Christine Elliott, Deputy Premier and Minister of Health. “To protect our hard-fought progress and ensure we can continue to manage COVID-19 for the long-term, more time is needed before we can take the next step forward in our reopening plan.” Ontario’s cautious approach is working, with weekly cases incidence rates still well below the national average and the province tracking below the lower range scenario for ICU projections outlined by the Ontario COVID-19 Science Advisory Table on October 22, 2021. However, the province has continued to be guided by the evidence, ensuring that key indicators continue to be assessed through each milestone of its plan to gradually lift public health and workplace safety measures. “While Ontario has continued to make progress as a result of its safe and cautious approach to reopening, it is necessary to make this deliberate pause as we approach the winter holidays where more people will begin gathering indoors and where students will be returning to in-class learning in January after celebrating with friends and family,” said Dr. Kieran Moore, Chief Medical Officer of Health. “Over the coming weeks and months, we need to stay the course on reaching those who have not yet been vaccinated, follow public health and workplace safety measures, and continue to remain vigilant in order to minimize the transmission of COVID-19 and keep our communities safe.” Ontarians are urged to remain vigilant and continue following public health and workplace safety measures in place and to get vaccinated if they have not done so already. Achieving the highest vaccination rates possible is key to reducing the risk of COVID-19 transmission and significant surges in cases. Responses will continue to be tailored to local context, with the ultimate goal of limiting disruption to people and businesses across the province. Quick Facts On November 10, 2021, Ontario’s unvaccinated and partially vaccinated population which represents 25 per cent of the province, amounted to 222 of Ontario’s 454 reported cases. Local medical officers of health continue to have the ability to issue advice, recommendations or instructions under the Reopening Ontario (A Flexible Response to COVID-19) Act, 2020 (ROA) as well as Section 22 orders under the Health Protection and Promotion Act, and municipalities may enact by-laws, to target specific transmission risks in the community. The National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommends an optimal interval of eight weeks between first and second doses of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series. Individuals who wish to get their second dose at a shorter interval, as applicable, can continue to do so but with informed consent. On November 30, 2021, the government intends to exempt food or drink establishments that are beyond security in Ontario’s airports from requiring patrons to provide proof of identification and of being fully vaccinated against COVID-19, given federal proof of vaccination requirements that come into effect on the same day. As of November 3, 2021, approximately 3 million individuals are now eligible to book a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, providing them with an extra layer of protection against the Delta variant. As of September 22, 2021, Ontarians are required to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 with proof of vaccination along with identification to access certain public settings and facilities unless an exemption applies under O. Reg. 364/20. The enhanced vaccine certificate with official QR code and the free, made-in Ontario Verify Ontario app are now available for download, making it easier, more secure and convenient for individuals to provide proof of vaccination where required to do so. As of November 10, 2021, nearly 8 million enhanced certificates with QR codes have been downloaded through the COVID-19 vaccination portal and there have been more than 1.4 million downloads of the Verify Ontario app. Additional Resources Ontario Releases Plan to Safely Reopen Ontario and Manage COVID-19 for the Long-Term Enhanced COVID-19 Vaccine Certificate with QR Code and Verify Ontario App Available for Download Starting October 15 Using your Enhanced Vaccine Certificate: Frequently Asked Questions Ontario to Require Proof of Vaccination in Select Settings Proof of Vaccination Guidance for Businesses and Organizations under the Reopening Act Ontario Expanding Booster Eligibility to More Ontarians For public inquiries, please contact the Provincial Vaccine Contact Centre at 1-833-943-3900 (TTY for people who are deaf, hearing-impaired or speech-impaired: 1-866-797-0007). For resources in multiple languages to help local communication efforts in responding to COVID-19, visit Ontario’s COVID-19 communication resources webpage. Visit Ontario’s website to learn more about how the province continues to protect the people of Ontario from COVID-19.

COVID-19: Proof of vaccination in Canada

COVID-19: Proof of vaccination in Canada

Vaccination records are issued by your province or territory. You can use the proof of vaccination to access services and to facilitate travel within and outside of Canada. Get your proof of vaccination Most provinces and territories issue and use the Canadian COVID-19 proof of vaccination. This proof of vaccination is a reliable way to show your vaccination history when travelling internationally. Get your Canadian proof of vaccination from your province or territory: Alberta (not currently issuing the Canadian proof) British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick (not currently issuing the Canadian proof) Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon Travel in Canada Starting October 30, 2021, at 3 am EDT: if you're 12 years of age plus 4 months, you'll need to show official proof of vaccination to board: domestic or international flights departing from most airports in Canada, including charter and foreign airlines carrying commercial passengers MedEvac flights and private flights that don't enter airport restricted areas are excluded VIA Rail and Rocky Mountaineer trains COVID-19: Boarding flights and trains in Canada Indigenous peoples and Northerners in remote communities If you aren't fully vaccinated and are travelling from or to a remote community, visit:
Proof of vaccination for Indigenous peoples and Northerners in remote communities Travel outside Canada The Canadian COVID-19 proof of vaccination is a reliable way to show your COVID-19 vaccination history when travelling internationally. How to get your Canadian COVID-19 proof of vaccination About the Canadian COVID-19 proof of vaccination Using your proof when travelling outside of Canada Related links Using Canada’s COVID-19 proof of vaccination for travel – Backgrounder, October 21, 2021 Mandatory COVID-19 vaccination requirements for federally regulated transportation employees and travellers - Backgrounder, October 6, 2021 How to get vaccinated near you

COVID-19 vaccines for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people

COVID-19 vaccines for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people

Find out how First Nations, Inuit and Métis people can get vaccinated against COVID-19 Overview Ontario has been working with Indigenous partners to develop a mass immunization plan for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people, recognizing local circumstances and individual community needs. If you were born in 2009 or earlier, and identify as First Nations, Inuit or Métis, there are two ways you can get a COVID-19covid 19 vaccine: contact your local First Nations, Inuit and Métis health organization or local Public Health Unit to learn about Indigenous vaccination in your region visit ontario.ca/bookvaccine to learn how to book your vaccination appointments at a mass immunization clinic Still waiting for your second dose? You can book your second dose today. If you already have a second dose appointment booked, you may be able to move it sooner: https://covid-19.ontario.ca/book-vaccine/ Find an Indigenous-supported clinic Find information about vaccination or book an appointment to get vaccinated. Provincewide Indigenous Primary Health Care Council Online: find your nearest Aboriginal Health Access Centre Northern Ontario Nishnawbe Aski Nation Online: find a list of urban community members vaccination clinics and booking information Ottawa and surrounding regions Akausivik Inuit Family Health Team Online: find booking and eligibility information Phone: 613-740-0999 Who can be vaccinated: all Inuit adults, including family and caregivers staff from Indigenous community agencies Clinic location: 24 Selkirk Street, Suite 300, Ottawa Clinic hours: Monday to Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Ottawa Ottawa Public Health and Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health Phone: 613-691-5505 (Monday to Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., and weekends 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.) Who can be vaccinated: First Nation, Inuit and Métis community members (16 and older) and their spouses and family household members Clinic location: St. Laurent Complex, 525 Coté Street, Ottawa Walk-in appointments are not available. Thunder Bay Ontario Native Women’s Association, Mindimooyenh Vaccination Clinic Online: complete the online registration form Phone: 807-697-1753 (Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.) Who can be vaccinated: all Indigenous adults over 16 or 18 years old (depending on vaccine type) and their families sharing the same household prioritization to those 55 and over must live in Thunder Bay Proof of Indigenous ancestry is required. Up to 6 members of the same household can register on the same form. Clinic location: Valhalla Inn, Ballroom, 1 Valhalla Inn Road, Thunder Bay Toronto and surrounding areas Auduzhe, Anishnawbe Health Toronto and partnered clinics Online: find a list of clinics and booking information Phone: 437-703-8703 Website includes: Indigenous-led community vaccine clinics hospital-based, Indigenous-focused vaccine clinics general vaccine clinics

COVID-19 Booster Doses

COVID-19 Booster Doses

While the COVID-19 vaccine is highly effective, Ontario is expanding eligibility for a booster dose to all Ontarians over time. Based on Ontario’s COVID-19covid 19 vaccination rollout for first and second doses, expansion of eligibility for booster doses will be based on age and risk. You must wait a minimum of six months after receiving your second dose before your can get your booster dose. Some vulnerable populations can get a third dose eight weeks after their second dose. August 17 Transplant recipients Patients with hematological cancers Recipients of an anti-CD20 agent Residents of high-risk congregate settings including long-term care homes, higher-risk licensed retirement homes and First Nations elder care lodges September 14 Patients undergoing active treatment for solid tumors Recipients of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell People with moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency People with stage 3 or advanced untreated HIV infection and those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome People undergoing active treatment with some categories of immunosuppressive therapies October 7 People who live in a retirement home People who live in congregate settings such as assisted-living facilities, chronic care hospitals and congregate senior’s apartment buildings People taking other immunosuppressant medications (contact your doctor to find out if you’re eligible) November 5 People aged 70 and older Health care workers Designated essential caregivers in congregate settings (including long-term care home and retirement home staff and designated caregivers) People who received two doses of AstraZeneca or one dose of Janssen (a complete series of a viral vector vaccine) People who are First Nation, Inuit and/or Métis People who are 18 years and older and live with people who are First Nation, Inuit and/or Métis Early 2022 Everyone age 12 and older who received their second dose at least six to eight months ago Where to get your booster dose If you are eligible, you can book your booster dose appointment: through the COVID-19 vaccination portal by calling the Provincial Vaccine Contact Centre at 1-833-943-3900 directly through public health units that use their own booking systems through Indigenous-led vaccination clinics select pharmacies primary care settings If you are a hospital-based health care worker, you can also contact your employer to get vaccinated directly through your hospital’s vaccination program. If you live in a retirement home, long-term care home, elder care lodge or congregate living setting, public health units will work with the homes to give you your shot within your home or at a mobile clinic. Locations and timing for booster doses may vary by public health unit based on local planning and considerations. Learn more: https://covid-19.ontario.ca/getting-covid-19-vaccine

COVID-19 vaccine safety

COVID-19 vaccine safety

Learn about the safety of COVID-19 Quick links: How to book appointments Find a pharmacy The coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine does not cause a coronavirus infection. It helps to build up your immunity to the virus, so your body will fight it off more easily if it affects you. This can reduce your risk of developing coronavirus and make your symptoms milder if you do get it. Questions about COVID-19 vaccines? Here are some answers. Vaccination is expected to be an effective way to prevent the spread and reduce the impact of COVID-19. The effectiveness and immune response of the vaccine is being monitored as the vaccine is rolled out. Only vaccines that Health Canada determines to be safe and effective will be approved for use in Canada and available in Ontario. After independent and thorough scientific reviews for safety, efficacy and quality, Health Canada has approved four vaccines for use in Canada: Pfizer-BioNTech – expected to be 95% effective after two doses Moderna – expected to be 94% effective after two doses AstraZeneca (AstraZeneca and COVISHIELD) – expected to be 64% effective after two doses The vaccines: were tested on a large number of people through extensive clinical trials have met all the requirements for approval, including safety are monitored for any adverse reactions that may occur after vaccination and appropriate measures will be taken Learn more about the vaccines from Health Canada’s website. Get vaccine facts and vaccine safety information in multiple languages. Possible side effects Like any medication, vaccines can cause mild side effects and reactions. These can last a few hours or a couple of days after vaccination. Common side effects may include: redness, soreness or swelling on the arm where you got the shot tiredness headache muscle and joint pain chills mild fever The vaccines cannot cause COVID-19. This is because they do not contain the SARS-CoV-2 virus responsible for the disease. However, if you come in contact with the virus just before or after you complete the vaccine series of two doses, you could still develop COVID-19.

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Get answers to questions about the COVID-19 vaccines from Ontario’s medical professionals When to call your doctor Vaccine reactions are rare. However, they may occur up to three days after getting vaccinated. Call your doctor or health care practitioner if you develop any of the following reactions within three days of receiving the vaccine: hives swelling of the face or mouth trouble breathing very pale colour and serious drowsiness high fever (over 40°C) convulsions or seizures other serious symptoms, such as numbness If you think you might be having a severe allergic reaction after leaving the vaccination site, call 911. If you do have a severe adverse reaction to a COVID-19 vaccine, you may be eligible for compensation from the federal government. Who should not get the vaccine You should not get the vaccine if you have: symptoms of COVID-19 another acute disease, such as strep throat, flu or pneumonia Speak with your doctor or health care provider before booking an appointment if you or the person you are booking for: is pregnant or breastfeeding has an autoimmune condition is immunocompromised due to disease or treatment has had severe allergic reactions to vaccinations before Read the Vaccination Recommendations for Special Populations for more information. Vaccine ingredients and how they work COVID-19 vaccines work by training your body’s immune system to recognize and fight the virus that causes the disease (SARS-CoV-2). To do this, the vaccine uses certain molecules or parts of the virus — called antigens — which trigger an immune response when they are introduced into the body through vaccination. By injecting these antigens into the body, your immune system safely learns to: recognize the antigens produce antibodies to fight the antigens remember the antigens for the future Available in described video
Get answers to questions about the COVID-19 vaccines from Ontario’s medical professionals If the virus reappears, your immune system will recognize the antigens and attack them before the disease can develop and cause sickness. In addition to the antigens, vaccines can also include: adjuvants (for example, aluminum salts) – help boost the body’s response to the vaccine antibiotics – prevent contamination during the manufacturing process preservatives and stabilizers – keep the vaccine stable, effective and safe when it’s being made, shipped and stored Vaccine types There are several different types of vaccines being studied to fight COVID-19. Three key types include: mRNA vaccines mRNA vaccines are a new type of vaccine. mRNA vaccines teach our cells how to make a protein from the virus that will trigger an immune response and create antibodies. These antibodies help us fight the infection if the real virus does enter our body in the future as they recognize this protein. The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines that Health Canada approved for use are both mRNA-type vaccines. Viral vector-based vaccines These vaccines use genetically modified viruses (vectors) that are harmless to humans. Once injected into the body, the viral vector contained in the vaccine produces a part of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, such as its spike protein (the part of the virus that binds to our cells and starts the COVID-19 infection). The vector virus is not the virus that causes COVID-19 and doesn't make you sick. It does its job and then goes away. This process triggers an immune response against the spike protein without exposing you to the virus that causes COVID-19. Viral vector-based vaccines have been used to develop: many vaccines for animals an Ebola vaccine approved by a number of international regulators The AstraZeneca and Janssen vaccines that Health Canada approved are viral vector-based. Virus-like particle vaccines Virus-like particles are molecules that mimic viruses but are not infectious. They are very similar to real viral molecules, so introducing them into the body through vaccination triggers an immune response, without any symptoms of the virus they are being vaccinated against. Once the body responds to the virus-like particles, it recognizes the virus and prevents infection in the future, giving people immunity to that particular virus. Virus-like particles have been an effective way of vaccinating against diseases such as: human papillomavirus (HPV) hepatitis B malaria Vaccine development Creating a new vaccine typically takes years. However, the COVID-19 vaccines were developed quickly for many reasons, including: being informed by decades of research on other strains of coronavirus prior to COVID-19, such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Sars-CoV (SARS) advances in science and technology international collaboration among scientists, health professionals, researchers, industry and governments increased dedicated funding Before any vaccines are available in Ontario, they: undergo rigorous clinical trials to ensure they are safe and effective are evaluated and authorized for use by Health Canada, using rigorous standards Ontario makes sure vaccines remain safe for Ontarians by: securely and safely transporting and storing vaccines at required conditions and temperatures establishing safe clinic spaces to give people immunizations, including providing the required training to those administering vaccines monitoring for any adverse reactions or side effects that may occur after vaccination and taking appropriate measures, including working with the federal government and other provinces and territories Once a vaccine is in use, Canada has a strong vaccine safety monitoring system to alert public health authorities of changing trends or unusual adverse reactions that were not previously reported. Read more information on vaccines and vaccine authorization updates from the Government of Canada. Approving vaccines in Canada Drugs, including vaccines, are regulated under the Food and Drugs Act and regulations. They must meet the regulatory requirements for safety, efficacy and quality before they can be approved for use and distribution in Canada. The federal government (Health Canada) is responsible for approving vaccines. Before authorizing a vaccine, Health Canada assesses the: scientific and clinical evidence — including results of clinical trials — to determine if a vaccine product is safe, effective and manufactured to the highest quality safety and efficacy of the vaccine to determine that there are no concerns, the vaccine can trigger an adequate immune response to protect against disease and the benefits outweigh the risks manufacturing process to make sure the manufacturer can carry out the necessary quality controls for the vaccine If there is not enough evidence to support the manufacturer’s safety, effectiveness or quality claims: Health Canada will not authorize the vaccine the product cannot be sold in Canada Find out more about Health Canada’s: vaccine approval process review of COVID-19covid 19 vaccines

Vaccines for children: COVID-19

Vaccines for children: COVID-19

Information on vaccines approved for children and youth Health Canada has authorized the following mRNA COVID-19 vaccines for youth aged 12 and older: Pfizer-BioNTech Comirnaty COVID-19 vaccine Moderna Spikevax COVID-19 vaccine People aged 12 to 17 may receive the same 2-dose schedule recommended for adults. At this time, no COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for use in children under the age of 12 in Canada. Clinical trials are underway to determine if: COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective in infants and children under 12 younger children need smaller doses Learn more about: Pfizer-BioNTech Comirnaty COVID-19 vaccine Moderna Spikevax COVID-19 vaccine How the vaccines are studied and tested for children and youth The mRNA COVID-19 vaccines were tested in youth through clinical trials that compared the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine to a placebo. They also compared safety and effectiveness across different age groups. These studies: confirm the vaccines are safe for use in youth aged 12 to 17 determine what doses are most effective for different age groups In phase 3 clinical trials, the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines were very effective at preventing COVID-19 with symptoms in youth aged 12 to 17. Learn more about: COVID-19: How effective the Pfizer-BioNTech Comirnaty vaccine was in protecting trial participants COVID-19: How effective the Moderna Spikevax vaccine was in protecting trial participants Vaccine manufacturers will continue to collect information about safety from clinical trial participants. Canada’s vaccine safety monitoring system will also help to detect any possible rare side effects that didn’t appear in the clinical trials. Learn more about: Vaccine development and approval in Canada COVID-19: How vaccines are developed (video) COVID-19 mRNA vaccines Importance of vaccination Although children and youth are less likely to get really sick from COVID-19, they can still: get sick from COVID-19 be infected and not have any symptoms spread COVID-19 to others experience longer-term effects if they do get infected Children and youth with certain underlying medical conditions may have a higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines help the body fight off the virus. Once fully vaccinated, people who get infected with COVID-19 will likely have no symptoms or mild symptoms. Like adults, youth are well protected against severe illness 14 days after their second dose. Those who have already had COVID-19 may still get vaccinated to protect themselves from getting it again. Millions of people aged 12 to 17 have received COVID-19 vaccines in Canada. High rates of vaccination coverage across the country is key to: controlling the spread of the virus protecting people from severe illness ending the crisis phase of the pandemic in Canada helping everyone return to normal activities Learn more about: Post COVID-19 condition (long-term symptoms) People at high risk of more severe illness or disease outcomes Vaccination coverage by age, sex, and province or territory COVID-19: Effectiveness and benefits of vaccination

SLFNHA Vaccine Reciept

SLFNHA Vaccine Reciept

SLFNHA health records phone number or online. OPTION 1: 1-807-737-5196 – SLFNHA health records The immunization repository is open 8:30-12 and 1-4:30 Monday through Friday. OPTION 2: Requires internet access and a health card – can be accessed and printed directly. https://covid19.ontariohealth.ca/app-identity?viewId=T4A7644GAWWX

A Parent's Guide to Vaccination

A Parent's Guide to Vaccination

Vaccination is the best way to protect your child's health Parents are responsible for the well-being of their children, including protecting them from illness caused by diseases that are vaccine-preventable. Learn about vaccination and why it is important to your child's health. Parents agree that feeding and sleeping schedules are important to help keep children healthy. The same goes for childhood vaccinations. Vaccinating your children is the best way to keep them safe from many serious and potentially deadly diseases. You can help protect your children by getting them vaccinated on time and keeping their shots up to date. What is a vaccine? Vaccines are made with a tiny amount of dead or weakened germs. They help the immune system learn how to protect itself against disease. Vaccines are a safe and effective way to keep your child from getting very sick from the real disease. Did you know? Vaccination can also be called immunization, vaccines, shots, or needles. These words mean the same thing. What is the immune system? The immune system is a special network in the body that protects you from germs, like bacteria and viruses that cause diseases. Through a series of steps called the immune response, the immune system learns how to recognize germs in order to fight them if your child is exposed to them in the future. Your child is exposed to thousands of germs daily at home, at daycare or in the grocery store. Even a sweet kiss from a brother or sister can be full of germs. Most of these germs are harmless and are easily handled by your child's immune system. But some germs can make your child very sick. Thanks to vaccination, your child's immune system learns how to recognize harmful germs. Vaccines help your child to develop the necessary defences to fight disease, and to stay healthy! How do vaccines work? The dead or weakened germs in vaccines help your child's immune system to make two important tools: antibodies and immune memory. Together, these tools will help your child recognize and fight off the germs if exposed to them in the future. Most children are fully protected after they are vaccinated. This means that they will never get serious vaccine-preventable diseases. In rare cases, children who are vaccinated can still get the disease because they only get partial protection from the vaccine. This is more common in children with a health problem that affects their immune system. They may develop mild symptoms if they are exposed to a disease, but will not suffer serious complications. It's just like... seatbelts are not 100% effective at protecting you while driving, but they significantly reduce your risk of being injured. Did you know? The word immunization comes from immune- which means protected from disease. How are vaccines given? Most vaccines are given by an injection (a needle) into your child's upper arm or thigh. Some vaccines can be given orally (by mouth) or nasally (sprayed into the nose). Your child can safely get more than one vaccine at a time. Some vaccines protect against several diseases in a single shot, while others are given separately. What if my child can't be vaccinated? Some children cannot receive certain vaccines due to allergic reactions or other medical conditions. Because they can't be vaccinated, they are at risk of getting diseases that the vaccine would have protected them from. You can help protect your children by encouraging those around your child to be up to date with their vaccination. Diseases that may not seem serious to adults can be very harmful to vulnerable children. Did you know? Your children, like you, should be vaccinated before you travel with them. They may need special vaccinations or need to be vaccinated earlier than usual. Diseases prevented by routine vaccinations Vaccinating your children protects them from many vaccine-preventable diseases. Nearly all these diseases can spread easily from person to person, mainly through coughing and sneezing. They can be serious enough to cause severe complications or even death. Getting your children vaccinated on time gives them the protection they need to stay healthy. See a list of diseases prevented by routine vaccinations here. Other vaccines, such as the one to protect your child against many strains of human papillomavirus (HPV), will be recommended as your child gets older. Talk to your healthcare provider about the vaccines your child needs to be fully protected. Visit Canada.ca/vaccines to find out more about these and other vaccine-preventable diseases. If people hardly ever get these diseases, why does my child need to be vaccinated? Diseases that were once common in childhood are now rare in Canada because of vaccines. But they still exist. Even one case of measles can spread quickly when people are not vaccinated. You can still catch measles one hour after an infected person has left the same room. It is not easy to tell who is carrying the germ, or if your child has been exposed. Many vaccine-preventable diseases have no treatment or cure. In some cases, children can die from complications of a disease. The best protection is to keep vaccinating. To better explain the importance of vaccination, here is an analogy: It's just like when we started bailing out a boat that had a slow leak; the boat was full of water (full of diseases). We have been bailing (vaccinating) fast and hard, and now the boat is almost dry. If we stop bailing (vaccinating) the water will continue to come in as there is still a leak (infectious diseases are still present). Vaccines are safe Vaccines are safe and provide important benefits for your children's health throughout their lives. Many parents with young children have not seen the vaccine-preventable diseases mentioned in this guide, so they may not know how serious the diseases are. As a result, parents may worry more about the side effects of vaccines than the diseases they prevent. How are vaccines approved? Vaccines must go through years of research, followed by testing and retesting before they can be used in Canada. Several systems are in place to monitor the creation, the use, and the safety of vaccines. Each vaccine MUST be proven to be safe and to work before it can be given. Vaccine reactions are reported by healthcare providers to local public health authorities to make sure unusual or unexpected reactions can be dealt with quickly. Watch our vaccine safety video @ Canada.ca/vaccines Is the vaccine safer than getting the real disease? Yes. Your child's natural immune system has no problem handling the weak or dead germs in a vaccine. Your child may have a mild fever or a sore arm after vaccination but these side effects only last a few days and should not disrupt daily activities.

However, if an unvaccinated child catches the real disease, the result can be serious, or even fatal. This is because active germs multiply quickly, and your child's immune system is not prepared to defend itself. Did you know? Vaccination prevents between two and three million deaths worldwide every year. It is safe, simple and it works! Your child needs to be vaccinated on time Vaccines work best when they are given on time, beginning when your child is very young. Routine vaccination is free across Canada; however, schedules may differ in each province or territory. Remember to check that your own vaccinations are up to date. Vaccination is a lifelong process. Why should I vaccinate my child at such a young age? The vaccination schedule is designed to protect your child before they are exposed to vaccine-preventable diseases. Children are vaccinated early in life because they are vulnerable to diseases and the consequences can be very serious. But if vaccinated on time, your child has the most protection as early as possible. When should my child be vaccinated? Your child needs to be vaccinated at several stages in order to be fully protected. Some vaccines need to be given more than once to build up your child's immune system. Immunization (vaccination) schedules could be different depending in which province or territory you live in. This means that some provinces or territories will give the same vaccine at different ages. But don't worry, your healthcare provider will give you a vaccination schedule that will tell you which vaccines are needed and at what age. Another way to find your child's immunization schedule is to check Canada.ca/vaccines where the schedule for each province and territory is listed. Here’s an example of a typical schedule; to be fully protected, your child will be vaccinated starting at birth or age two months, then at four months, six months, between 12 months and 18 months-and also between ages four to six years. Additional vaccinations are needed for school-age children. Did you know? Babies have the capacity to produce up to one billion antibodies. As such, it is estimated that (theoretically) an average baby could handle up to 10,000 vaccines at one time without concern. Can my child get more than one vaccine at a time? Yes. Some vaccines are given together to protect against several diseases at once. Your child's immune system is AMAZING! It can easily handle more than one vaccine at a time safely and effectively. Your healthcare provider will let you know which vaccines your child needs at each visit. Where do I get my child vaccinated? Contact your healthcare provider to find out where to get vaccinations. You can search the Internet for your nearest public health office (Centre Local de Services Communautaires (CLSC) in Quebec). What if we missed a shot? Life with young children can be very busy. You may not be able to make every vaccination appointment for your child. But it is important to get back on schedule. You should book an appointment with your healthcare provider as soon as possible. They can help you figure out what vaccines your child has already had and which ones are needed. What if we move? If you move to another province or territory, your child's vaccination schedule may change. Once you have moved, contact your new healthcare provider to find out which vaccines may be needed. Remember to take your child's vaccination record to the appointment with you. Your child depends on you for vaccination protection. Getting your children vaccinated on time is one of the most important jobs you have as a parent. When you vaccinate your children, you protect them from serious diseases for the rest of their life. Why is it important to keep track of your child's vaccination? Proof of vaccination may be requested. In some parts of Canada, children need to have all of their vaccinations up to date before starting school or daycare. This is needed to help prevent the spread of serious diseases in these settings. Also, your child's vaccination history is helpful if you ever need to take your child to see another healthcare provider or travel outside of Canada. How do I keep track of my child's vaccination? You will be given a vaccination record (card or booklet) with your child's recommended schedule at your first clinic visit. If your healthcare provider forgets, be sure to ask for one. It is important to bring this record with you every time you visit a healthcare provider. This is to make sure that it can be updated each time your child receives a vaccine. You might find it helpful to use the checklist at the back of this guide, or download the CANImmunize mobile app to help you keep track of your family's vaccinations. When travelling to another country, you and your family may be at risk for vaccine-preventable diseases. These may include diseases for which vaccines are not routinely given in Canada. It is important to consult a healthcare provider, or visit a travel health clinic, at least six weeks before you travel. Certain vaccines may be recommended depending on your age, where you plan to travel and what you plan to do. Visit Canada.ca/travel for helpful travel advice and information. What to expect at your child's first vaccination You can help your child have a positive vaccination experience. Understanding what will happen when your child is vaccinated can make it easier on both of you. What if my child has a cold or fever? If your child is sick or has a fever when it's time for their vaccination, talk to your healthcare provider. They can assess whether it is okay to give the vaccination or if it is better to wait until your child is no longer sick. Before the vaccination Remember to take your child's vaccination record with you when you visit your healthcare provider or public health office (CLSC in Quebec). If you don't have a vaccination record, be sure to ask for one. During the vaccination Your healthcare provider may ask you a few questions about your child's health, such as if they have allergies or health problems. Here are some things you can do to help your child during the vaccination. Relax. Your child may react to your emotions. When you relax and stay positive, your child will be happier too. Cuddle. Hold and talk to your child during the vaccination. Studies have found that children who are held while getting a needle cry less. Breastfeed. If you are breastfeeding, try nursing your baby right before, during or after the needle. This will be comforting to your baby. Distract. Your gentle, soothing voice or touch can help comfort your baby. So can a favourite toy, telling a story or singing. After the vaccination Most children are fine after vaccination. Your child may have no reaction at all to the vaccine. In some cases, your child may: be fussy; be sleepier than usual; have a low fever; or have a sore, swollen, or red spot where the needle went in. These reactions are normal and usually last between 12 and 24 hours. You can give your child medicine to help with the pain or lower the fever. Ask your healthcare provider what medicine is best. Before you go home Make an appointment for your child's next vaccination. You will be asked to wait at the clinic for 15 to 20 minutes after your child's vaccination. This is because, as with any medicine, there is a very slight chance of a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). Signs of a serious allergic reaction include: breathing problems (wheezing); swelling of the face; and/or blotchy red rash on the skin (hives). If you see any of these symptoms, talk to a healthcare provider immediately. They know what to do to counter the allergic reaction. When to call your healthcare provider Serious reactions to vaccines are very rare. Call your healthcare provider or public health office (CLSC in Quebec) if your child has unusual symptoms after vaccination.
Unusual symptoms may include: a fever above 40°C (104°F); crying or fussing for more than 24 hours; worsening swelling where the needle went in; and/or unusual sleepiness. You know your child best. If you notice anything that is not normal after a vaccination, check with your healthcare provider. Where to find more information It is important to get the facts about vaccination from reliable sources. Talk to a trusted healthcare provider about your child's vaccinations. This can be your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Here are some websites you can trust to find information on vaccination: Public Health Agency of Canada Canadian Paediatric Society Immunize Canada The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada There are other free resources you can request @ Canada.ca/vaccines:
Not Just for Kids. An Adult Guide to Vaccination
Teens, meet Vaccines Checklist for your child's vaccinations Make an appointment. The first vaccination may start at birth but certainly by the age of two months. Your healthcare provider will give you a schedule for your child. Bring your child's vaccination record. You will get this at your first appointment. Make the next appointment. Set a date for your child's next vaccination before you leave your healthcare provider's office. Mark the next date in your cell phone or home calendar. Do this as soon as possible so you will not forget. Keep your child's vaccination record in a safe place, so you can find it when you need it.
Remember, vaccination is part of your children's routine care. Keeping vaccinations up to date is important to protect their health.

Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit (CRCB)

Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit (CRCB)

CRCB extends to November 20, 2021. The CRCB is extending until November 20, 2021. The government is also proposing a further extension of this benefit until May 7, 2022 with an increase to the maximum number of weeks. The Canada Recovery Caregiving Benefit (CRCB) gives income support to employed and self-employed individuals who are unable to work because they must care for their child under 12 years old or a family member who needs supervised care. This applies if their school, regular program or facility is closed or unavailable to them due to COVID-19, or because they are sick, self-isolating, or at risk of serious health complications due to COVID-19. The CRCB is administered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). If you are eligible for the CRCB, your household can receive $500 ($450 after taxes withheld) for each 1-week period. If your situation continues, you will need to apply again. Each household may apply for up to a total of 42 weeks between September 27, 2020 and November 20, 2021. Learn more: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/benefits/recovery-caregiving-benefit.html

Canada Recovery Hiring Program (CRHP)

Canada Recovery Hiring Program (CRHP)

The government is proposing to continue the CRHP until May 2022. Read the October 21 announcement. As a Canadian employer who continues to be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be eligible to apply for one of the two subsidies to cover part of your employee wages. The CRHP and the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) support wages you pay through different phases of your economic recovery. Each claim period, eligible employers can claim either CRHP or CEWS, whichever is higher. Learn more: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/subsidy/recovery-hiring-program.html